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Tofu the facts and its benefits

 

Tofu, also known as bean curd, is a food cultivated by coagulating soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into soft white blocks. It is a component in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines. Tofu can be soft, firm, or extra firm
Nutritionally, tofu is not only a great source of protein, at 8.5g of protein per 100g, but it’s also low in saturated fat at 0.8g per 100g. To put that into perspective; an average woman between the ages of 19 and 50 requires around 45g of protein per day and no more than 20g of saturated fat each day.


Flavour-wise, tofu isn’t much to speak of on its own, but it’s a behemoth when used in recipes that feature strong herbs or spices. Tofu is available in different grades of texture, from firm to silken. Firm tofu works especially well in stir-fries and curries, as it holds its texture together well. This beautiful bun cha recipe from Jamie magazine uses tofu alongside red chilli, soy sauce and sesame oil to really give the tofu a boost of flavour!
The soft, silken tofu is best used in dips, smoothies and desserts, however, as it can be blitzed in a blender easily to create a creamy texture. This recipe for vegan chocolate pots really makes tofu the centre of attention. They are also quite high in saturated fat, so should be eaten occasionally as a treat!
Tofu also provides a selection of micronutrients such as copper, manganese, thiamine (vitamin B1) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6). Manganese makes and activates some of the enzymes in the body and the B vitamins, B1 and B6 are responsible for the release of energy from carbohydrates and the metabolism of amino acids (building blocks of protein) respectively.

So, whether you’re a meat eater or not, tofu is a great ingredient to include in one’s diet, as it’s such a versatile and nutritious food. if you’re struggling! reference Jamie Oliver



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