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How I diverted my journey to ‘diabetes city’

bread-2178874_1920It was during a routine health check that my GP requested for a blood test. This test included a fasting blood test for diabetes. A couple of days later I had a phone call from the surgery requesting that I contact my GP immediately, which I did. I was informed then that my blood/sugar level was on the high side, and that I needed to have a glucose tolerance test. This test confirmed what was suspected I was on the border to type 2 diabetes. ( So what  is diabetes quotes from NHS choices) and the harm associated with it.)
Quote from NHS choices

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to become too high.
The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood
There are two main types of diabetes:
type 1 – where the pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin
type 2 – where the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin
These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes.
Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth.
Symptoms of diabetes

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The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy.
Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine.
Typical symptoms include:
feeling very thirsty
passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night
feeling very tired
weight loss and loss of muscle bulk
Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.
See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It’s very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated.
Read about how type 2 diabetes is diagnosed.
Causes of type 2 diabetes

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Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy.
Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It’s far more common than type 1 diabetes.
Read about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes.
Treating type 2 diabetes

As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels.
Read more about the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
Complications of type 2 diabetes

Diabetes can cause serious long-term health problems. It’s the most common cause of vision loss and blindness in people of working age.
Everyone with diabetes aged 12 or over should be invited to have their eyes screened once a year for diabetic retinopathy.
Diabetes is also responsible for most cases of kidney failure and lower limb amputation, other than accidents.
People with diabetes are up to five times more likely to have cardiovascular disease, such as a stroke, than those without diabetes.
Read more about the complications of type 2 diabetes.
Preventing type 2 diabetes

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If you’re at risk of type 2 diabetes, you may be able to prevent it developing by making lifestyle changes.
These include:
eating a healthy, balanced diet
losing weight if you’re overweight, and maintaining a healthy weight
stopping smoking if you smoke
drinking alcohol in moderation
taking plenty of regular exercises
Unquote

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My GP likened it to someone waiting at the train station for the train to diabetes city. I was referred to a diabetic nurse who was to manage my diabetes. It was during the session with the nurse that, following from all the information, that had been passed on to me, I was determined to cure myself of that diabetes.
Basically, this evolved lifestyle changes: diet, exercise habits.
I quickly signed up with a local gym, something I had always wanted to do anyway. Losing weight is one of the many ways of getting rid of it, so I engaged the help of a personal trainer only for the introductory period. I needed to lose weight, so took to visiting the gym at least three times a week.
My diet changed, fewer carbohydrates, more low-level protein, and more fruit and vegetables. I kept a diary of my gym activities, gradually I began to lose weight, I felt better for myself, slept better as well. Prior to that sometimes I found myself staying up at night not able to sleep.
Incidentally, apart from the suspected diabetes, I also had a problem with my knees. I had arthritis I had been advised by the musculoskeletal department to undertake exercises that would strengthen the muscles in my thigh which hopefully would ease the pressure on my knees.

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The lifestyle changes did make a significant difference; subsequent test revealed that my blood/sugar level had gone back to normal. My arthritis had disappeared. I have diverted my trip to ‘diabetes city’, and on the train to ‘Good city’. I will forever continue going to the gym and working out. This has been an eye opener, So my advice is that we should not wait to be told that we were on the border to acquiring ‘diabetes citizenship’, let’s make those lifestyle changes right now. For more information on similar topics please look us up on www.youhavealife.com/ keep living a healthy life, ‘’your health is your greatest asset so take care of it’’