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Exhausted? Nearly HALF of girls aged 11-18 and a quarter or working women have an iron deficiency

By MailOnline Reporter
PUBLISHED: 19:03, 3 January 2017 | UPDATED: 15:02, 4 January 2017

 

Iron is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the UK, with almost half the girls aged 11 to 18, and more than a quarter of working-age women, falling short of intakes needed for good health.
A recent survey found that four out of five women have struggled with extreme tiredness and two-thirds of women in the UK have experienced more than one episode of exhaustion.
Iron and energy levels are interlinked because we need the mineral to make haemoglobin, the bit in red blood cells which transports oxygen around the body.

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Tired? A recent survey found that four out of five women have struggled with extreme tiredness and two-thirds have experienced more than one episode of exhaustion
Women are at greatest risk of iron deficiency because of blood loss during monthly menstruation, but vegetarians and those who avoid red meat are also likely to be low.
But new research shows that long term deficiency can also contribute to hearing loss.
Dr Hilary Jones says: ‘Tiredness is one of the most common problems doctors see in general practice, but by the time people reach their GP they have often been struggling for weeks or months.
‘And paradoxically it’s often the ‘healthiest’ people who are not getting their requirements from diet.’
Studies have shown that a third of female athletes are deficient in iron and 56 per cent of joggers and regular runners are also low. Dr Jones explains: ‘Runners lose a lot of iron through foot-strike haemolysis, where red blood cells are ruptured as the foot hits the ground.
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Gender difference: Women are at greatest risk of iron deficiency because of blood loss during monthly menstruation
Swapping red meat, which is a rich source of readily absorbed iron, for chicken, fish and vegetarian options is also undermining iron intakes.
In the past two years, women’s average red meat intake has dropped by 13 per cent — and over the same period the number of who fall short of the minimum recommended intake of iron has leapt by 17 per cent.
Dr Jones says: ‘There are some obvious dietary changes, like eating more red meat, which will help improve your iron levels. But for many women, supplements are really the only solution — and that also presents problems, as most come with some pretty unpleasant side-effects.
‘Oral iron supplements are often poorly absorbed. Three-quarters of women experience gastrointestinal side-effects such as pain, nausea, constipation or diarrhoea and around 40 per cent regularly skip doses of their oral iron medication, or stop taking it all together.’
He adds: ‘The problem is that conventional iron supplements start oxidising and forming free radicals in the stomach, which is why you get the side-effects. It’s rusting, if you like, and the iron isn’t being absorbed.’

 

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New obesity INJECTION ‘triggers significant weight loss’:

Scientists developed a new treatment called bariatric arterial embolizaiton
It involves injecting small beads into the stomach to initiate weight loss
The beads help lower the levels of ghrelin – the hunger hormone
An early clinical trial proved it was effective for severely obese people
Scientists say the procedure is minimally invasive – and safe
By LISA RYAN FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

 

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Injecting microscopic beads into the stomach can minimize hunger and initiate weight loss, experts have revealed.
The minimally invasive treatment, known as bariatric arterial embolization, was developed by a team of Johns Hopkins University scientists.
The beads help lower levels of ghrelin – one of the main hormones involved in controlling hunger – in the stomach.
An early clinical trial found that the treatment is safe and effective in sustaining weight loss in severely obese people.
Scientists developed a weight loss treatment – called bariatric arterial embolization – that involves injecting microscopic beads into a person’s stomach to stave off hunger by reducing levels of a hormone called ghrelin

Scientists developed a weight loss treatment – called bariatric arterial embolization – that involves injecting microscopic beads into a person’s stomach to stave off hunger by reducing levels of a hormone called ghrelin
Dr Clifford Weiss, director of interventional radiology research at Johns Hopkins, said: ‘Obesity is a highly prevalent, detrimental and costly disease in the US and abroad.
‘The interventions currently available to treat this condition are behavioural modifications, diet and exercise, medications and invasive surgery.
‘We’re excited about the possibility of adding bariatric arterial embolization as another tool for health care providers to offer patients in the effort to curb this epidemic.’

The early phase of a clinical trial – called Bariatric Embolization of Arteries for the Treatment of Obesity (BEAT) – involved a team of weight loss physicians, physiologists, hormones specialists, gastroenterologists and more.
Six women and one man, between the ages of 31 and 59, enrolled in the trail.
Each of the participants were severely obese – with BMIs ranging from 40 to 50, far above the obesity threshold of a BMI of 30 – but were otherwise healthy.
Scientists tracked their weight loss, ghrelin levels, hunger and satiety assessments and adverse events at one, three and six months.
Each of the participants were educated on ways to change their diet and lifestyle before and after the procedure.
These early results demonstrate that bariatric arterial embolization is safe and appears to be effective in helping patients lose a significant amount of weight in a short and intermediate term
Dr Clifford Weiss, of Johns Hopkins
They then underwent bariatric arterial embolization – which involves the injection of microscopic beads through a small catheter injected in a small nick in the skin of the groin or wrist.
The beads are targeted to a portion of the stomach, called the fundus – which produces the majority of the body’s ghrelin – known as the ‘hunger hormone’.
The scientists hypothesized that the beads would decrease blood flow and limit the secretion of ghrelin, which would, in turn, minimize hunger and initiate weight loss.
All of the patients demonstrated weight loss and ‘dramatic hunger reduction levels’ following the procedure.
They had an average excess weight loss – the percentage of pounds lost above the patient’s ideal body weight – of 5.9 per cent at one month, 9.5 per cent at three months and 13.3 per cent at six months.
Furthermore, the participants reported an average 81 per cent, 59 per cent and 26 per cent decrease in hunger/appetite score at two weeks, one months and three months, respectively.
Their perceived sensation of hunger throughout the day was assessed through appetite and satiety questionnaires, which were completed for six days before the procedure and for six consecutive days before each follow-up visit.
Scientists also found that the patients had an average 17.5 per cent decrease in ghrelin levels at three months.
A clinical trial found that severely obese participants had a 26 per cent decreased hunger score after three months, as well as a 17.5 per cent decrease in ghrelin levels at that time

A clinical trial found that severely obese participants had a 26 per cent decreased hunger score after three months, as well as a 17.5 per cent decrease in ghrelin levels at that time
Dr Weiss said: ‘These early results demonstrate that bariatric arterial embolization is safe and appears to be effective in helping patients lose a significant amount of weight in a short and intermediate term.
‘Compared to a surgical gastric bypass procedure, bariatric arterial embolization is significantly less invasive and has a much shorter recovery time.’
The research is still in the early stages, but the trial demonstrated the safety of the procedure, according to the doctor.
Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate larger numbers of patients to determine efficacy and durability over time.
Dr Weiss said: ‘As this study expands and includes more patients both at Johns Hopkins, and now at Mount Sinai Health System in New York, we are able to gain more insight into the effectiveness of bariatric arterial embolization and the role interventional radiology can play in the critical battle against obesity.’
The findings were presented at the Society for Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

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Waitrose home for healthy foods

Cucamelons are not modified, have grown naturally in Mexico for centuries
Can be eaten straight from plant, tossed with olives or popped in a martini
The plants will be available to purchase from Wednesday for £4
By SEAN POULTER FOR THE DAILY MAIL

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It looks like a watermelon but is the size of a grape and tastes something like a cross between a cucumber and a lime.
The tiny cucamelon is not some genetically modified laboratory creation, but rather an import which originated in the wilds of Mexico thousands of years ago.
And now, it has reached the high street as a grow-your-own plant alongside tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce.
Cucamelon plants and Indigo Rose tomato plants go on sale in 50 Waitrose branches costing £4 a pot

Cucamelon plants and Indigo Rose tomato plants go on sale in 50 Waitrose branches costing £4 a pot
Waitrose is to offer pots of the vines that produce the cucamelons as part of a wider collection of plants that can be grown on a windowsill, tub or a vegetable plot.
The cucamelon plants have been grown by Suttons Seeds in Yorkshire and are part of a range created by James Wong, the Kew-trained botanist, science writer and author of the book Homegrown Revolution.
It also includes several salad tomato varieties, sweetcorn, cucumber and peppers, including the powerful Scotch Bonnet chilli.
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Mr Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack with drinks – or even popped in a martini.’
The versatile plants can be grown easily and in the same way as a regular cucumber.
And there is no need for the cover of a greenhouse as long as there isn’t a risk of frost.
The cucamelon, which has the Latin name Melothria scabra, is a vine grown for its edible fruit which originated in Mexico and Central America.
Other common names include sandiita or little watermelon, mouse melon, Mexican sour gherkin, Mexican miniature watermelon and Mexican sour cucumber.
They are pest and drought resistant and, in theory, the slow-growing vines can eventually grow up to ten feet under proper conditions.
Range-creator James Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack – or even popped in a martini.’

Range-creator James Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack – or even popped in a martini.’
Victoria Mason, Waitrose outdoor plant buyer, said: ‘We know that, after cooking, gardening is our customers’ favourite hobby, so we wanted to introduce something a little bit out of the ordinary that they can grow and enjoy.
‘This fun fruit is easy to grow so is the perfect plant for all ages to try their hand at gardening.
‘The new James Wong range shows you don’t have to stick with the traditional when growing your own vegetables and offers some exciting new additions for our customers’ gardens.’
The plants will be available from wednesday and will be in the majority of Waitrose branches by the end of April.
They are priced at £4 and are on a 3 for £10 mix and match offer along with other grow-your-old plants in the range.

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How sunbathing can LOWER your levels of vitamin D: Getting too much of a tan ‘stops the body producing nutrient’ Read more:

vitamin D: Getting too much of a tan ‘stops the body producing nutrient’
Vitamin D is created under the skin when we are exposed to sunlight
New study found too much sunbathing can lower levels in the body
Experts think pigment released when we tan blocks production of vitamin
Study found people exposed to sun with very brown skin were deficient
By MADLEN DAVIES FOR MAILONLINE

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We’re told to spend short bursts in the sun to top up our body’s levels of vitamin D.
But a new study has found sunbathing for too long could actually lower levels of the vitamin in the body.
Surprisingly, people exposed to the sun on a daily basis and who have very brown skin are deficient in vitamin D, researchers revealed.
They believe the pigment released when we tan – which turns our skin brown – may block the production of nutrient in the skin.
Sunbathing for hours might lower levels of vitamin D in the body, a study has found. Researchers said the pigment released when we tan – which turns our skin brown ¿ may block the production of nutrient in the skin
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Sunbathing for hours might lower levels of vitamin D in the body, a study has found. Researchers said the pigment released when we tan – which turns our skin brown – may block the production of nutrient in the skin
Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones, and a deficiency can cause bones to become soft and weak, which can lead to bone deformities.
In children, a lack of vitamin D can lead to scurvy, while in adults, it can lead to osteomalacia, which causes bone pain and tenderness.
While we get some vitamin D from some foods, including oily fish, meat and eggs, our body creates most of it from direct sunlight on our skin.
And a 2010 British Medical Journal clinical review found that vitamin D deficiency can increase the risk of developing heart disease, bowel and breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and diabetes.
In light of this, in the UK, groups at risk of vitamin D deficiency are given supplements.
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Researchers from the University of Pernambuco Medical School wanted to know if people with tanned skin were less likely to be deficient.
As part of the study, they examined nearly 1,000 people from Recife, Brazil, who were between 13 and 82 years old.
They all were exposed to the sun every day but did not use suncream and did not take vitamin D supplements.
Researchers used the Fitzpatrick skin phototype scale, a measure used by dermatologists to rate a person’s skin type and colour.
Using this scale they assessed how different skin types responded to the UV light found in sunlight.
Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones, and a deficiency can cause bones to become soft and weak, which can lead to bone deformities. Pictured is an X-ray of a child with scurvy

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Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones, and a deficiency can cause bones to become soft and weak, which can lead to bone deformities. Pictured is an X-ray of a child with scurvy
Usually, higher scores on the Fitzpatrick scale indicate a person has a darker skin tone and is more likely to tan rather than burn in the sun.
The team also calculated a ‘sun index’ for each person – by multiplying the number of hours they spent in the sun every week by the amount of their body’s skin they exposed.
Then, researchers compared people’s ‘sun index’ score and their skin type with how much vitamin D they had in their blood.
Overall, 72 per cent of people were deficient in vitamin D.
Those lacking in this nutrient tended to be older and spend less time in the sun.
However, surprisingly, they found many people with very high daily exposure to the sun also had lower than average vitamin D levels.
The study’s lead author Dr Francisco Bandeira, of the University of Pernambuco Medical School, said the findings suggest skin tanning, which occurs to protect the skin against the harmful effects of UV rays, stops levels of vitamin D rising in the blood.
The research was presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston.

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Louise Thompson: How to stop negative people from bursting your bubble

Email Louise
@FlexHappy
Louise Thompson ‘s Opinion
Inspirational advice to rock your life with energy, passion, happiness and balance.
Louise Thompson: How to stop negative people from bursting your bubble

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Health & Wellbeing Life & Style Life & Style comment… Louise Thompson Opinion
Just because someone else thinks it’s a bad idea does not mean it’s a bad idea. Photo / iStock
Just because someone else thinks it’s a bad idea does not mean it’s a bad idea. Photo / iStock
You know when you have that great plan to quit your job and start your own business (yay!), or move across the country for a new life (yay!), build your own house (yay!), or give online dating a crack after many years solo (yay!) and you are all excited about it, then a well-meaning friend or rellie pours a heap of cold water over it. How it’s never going to work. It’s a stupid plan. What are you thinking? Do you not realise just how wrong that could go? It’s really risky. You obviously haven’t thought it through.

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Mother with bowel cancer: Vitamin C helped me

Cancer cellsFive months ago, Natalee Lawson was told by her doctor to “go home and be comfortable”.

The bowel cancer patient interpreted that as: “We can’t do anything, wait till something happens and maybe that will be the end. Cancer has taken over, you can’t do anything.”

Tumours had spread to her liver, lungs, chest and a spot between the spine and an artery.

But this month, a CT scan showed the original tumours in her chest, lung and near her spine were gone, although a new one, 6mm long, had appeared on one lung.

The 35-year-old mother-of-two from Morrinsville, who the Herald originally spoke to in November, plans to return to her job as a lab worker at Fonterra’s Waitoa factory in May, starting at two hours a day.

She puts the disappearance of tumours down to controversial high-dose vitamin C infusions.

Mrs Lawson was diagnosed with bowel cancer on March 9 last year, her 10th wedding anniversary. She began the $195 infusions and has had two doses most weeks since.

In October, after finishing chemotherapy, she severely restricted her diet on the advice of her Hamilton vitamin provider, giving up wheat, dairy foods, sugar and red meat.

That’s when her oncologist told her to go home and be comfortable.

“I wasn’t happy with that. I can’t sit at home and wait to die.”

She pushed for surgery to remove the tumours, ringing “until I found someone to do the surgery for me”.

“He spoke to my oncologist. She still said ‘No, Natalee does not need it’. But we ended up doing it anyway because it was in a private [hospital].”

Cancerous liver was removed in December and in January the bowel tumour was taken out.

“I truly believe it’s the vitamin C and the diet that Dr Bill Reeder put me on. I don’t think I would still be here without it. For some people it’s not going to work. If it doesn’t stop cancer cells, it boosts your immune system and gives you more energy.”

Her oncologist has told her to expect cancer to return at some stage, but Nat is grabbing hold of life.

“My boy [Harper, 8, her eldest] said, ‘Everything’s back to normal now Mum,’ and I said, ‘Yeah, we’re getting there’.”

Bowel Cancer New Zealand spokeswoman Mary Bradley said many bowel cancer patients have vitamin C infusions.

“Bowel Cancer NZ supports patients exploring different treatment options in conjunction with their medical team’s plan.”

Oncologist and Cancer Society medical director Dr Chris Jackson said he can neither recommend high-dose vitamin C nor dissuade patients from having it because of the “conflicting evidence”.

Although many people report feeling better after having it, no good-quality trials in patients have found a therapeutic benefit and there is a risk of kidney failure.

Health researcher Dr Shaun Holt, who has written a book assessing alternative and complementary cancer therapies, notes there is also a risk the high doses will reduce the effectiveness of radiation therapy.

But Otago University scientist Professor Margreet Vissers, who is raising money for study to find the optimal intravenous dose, has reported that bowel surgery patients whose tumours contain higher levels of vitamin C live longer without cancer relapse than those with lower levels.

A registered medical practitioner, Dr Reeder abides by the Medicines Act requirement to avoid making therapeutic claims which have not been approved by the Health Minister through the evidence-based drug-licensing system. “It [vitamin C] is registered as a medicine but not as a cancer treatment, so we don’t claim evidence it will treat cancer.”

The main effect he observes is an immediate improvement in people’s quality of life.

High-dose vitamin C infusions for cancer
• A controversial alternative therapy.

• Christchurch-based study found cancer tissue grew more slowly if it had higher levels of vitamin C.

• No well-designed clinical trials have shown a therapeutic benefit in cancer patients.

• Many bowel cancer patients pay privately for the infusions.

• Nat Lawson says it has kept her alive.

– NZ Herald

Read more by Martin Johnston Email Martin JohnstonEmailPrint

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From pumpkin seeds to coconut water and cherries, we reveal the 9 foods and nutrients that will help you sleep better Read more: http:

As well as leaving you in a bad mood, lack of sleep is bad for your health
Nutritionists reveal what you eat can have a big impact on how you sleep
They list the 9 foods and nutrients that are essential to a good night’s kip
By LIZZIE PARRY FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

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Meditation, picking up a good book, even counting sheep.
All are remedies that are said to help you switch off and drift off to the land of nod.
As well as sparking an irritable mood and general feelings of misery, a lack of sleep is detrimental to a person’s health.
Countless studies have warned of the dangers of not getting between six to eight hours sleep a night – generally accepted as the gold standard in sleep terms.
Research has linked sleep disorders to life-threatening conditions including heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
But, as well as relaxation techniques and ditching your blue-light emitting smartphone and tablet, there is another way to maximise the chances of getting a good night’s sleep.
Nutritionists purport the benefits of a healthy diet, including key food groups packed with snooze-inducing nutrients and vitamins.
Here we reveal the eight foods the experts advise you eat to sleep tight each night.
As well as leaving you in a bad mood, a lack of sleep has been linked to a number of health conditions, including heart disease
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As well as leaving you in a bad mood, a lack of sleep has been linked to a number of health conditions, including heart disease
Here nutritionists reveal the nine foods and nutrients that can help you sleep better

Here nutritionists reveal the nine foods and nutrients that can help you sleep better
1. SLOW-RELEASE CARBS
Carbohydrates that slowly release energy into the body, such as oats or oatcakes, and brown rice, can help transform a person’s sleep pattern.
Nutritionist Cassandra Barns, said: ‘Slow-releasing carbohydrates such as whole grains help to keep the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood stable, and so provide your body with sustained energy.
‘You may not think you need much energy while you’re asleep, but your brain and body still need glucose to keep working.
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‘If levels fall too low, this can cause the release of the hormones adrenaline and cortisol, which can wake you up.’
To avoid a rude awakening mid-way through the night, Ms Barns said ensure you stock the cupboards with slow-releasing carbohydrates, a serving of brown rice or a slice of rye bread with dinner, for example.
‘If you have your last meal a long time before going to bed, try eating a half-size bowl of porridge or a couple of oatcakes with nut butter later in the evening,’ she added.
‘Note, sugary foods and refined white carbohydrates can have the opposite effect, as they quickly enter and leave the bloodstream, leaving your blood low in glucose again after only a short period of time.’
Slow-releasing carbohydrates such as whole grains help to keep the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood stable, and so provide your body with sustained energy, Cassandra Barns said

Foods that are high in protein provide the amino acid tryptophan, which converts into the hormones serotonin and melatonin – both of which aid sleep

 

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2. PROTEIN
High protein foods, such as meat, fish, beans and lentils, seeds and nuts are also vital in helping promote a better night’s sleep.
Shona Wilkinson, head nutritionist at www.nutricentre.com, said: ‘Protein foods provide the amino acid, tryptophan, which converts into the hormones serotonin and melatonin.
‘Melatonin in particular is needed for good sleep.’
She advises a good portion of protein is about 0.8 to 1g per kg of body weight, each day.
So, a woman who weighs 50kg, for example, should eat between 40 and 50g of protein a day.
‘Avoid too much high-protein food in the last few hours before bed however, as they can be hard to digest – especially red meat and nuts,’ Ms Wilkinson warned.

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3. PUMPKIN SEEDS
Pumpkin seeds are high in natural magnesium, making them beneficial to those people who struggle to drift off each night.
‘One of the roles of magnesium is allowing the muscle fibres in our body to relax,’ explained Dr Marilyn Glenville, one of the UK’s leading nutritionists and author of the Natural Health Bible for Women.
‘It counteracts calcium, which causes muscles to contract.
‘It is also thought that magnesium has a role in the normal function of the pineal gland, which produces melatonin – a hormone that regulates the sleep-wake cycle and helps us to fall asleep.’
Dr Glenville advises trying one to two tablespoons of pumpkin seeds a day, adding them to sugar-free yoghurt or salads, or grinding them up and adding them to porridge.
‘Other raw seeds and nuts are also good sources of magnesium, as are leafy green vegetables,’ she added.
Pumpkin seeds sprinkled on salads or ground up and added to smoothies can help send you off to the land of nod. Their secret? They are high in magnesium, experts said
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Pumpkin seeds sprinkled on salads or ground up and added to smoothies can help send you off to the land of nod. Their secret? They are high in magnesium, experts said
Coconut water is an excellent source of electrolyte minerals – potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and sodium. Balanced levels of these minerals are necessary to maintain normal muscle action. And so deficiencies can cause cramping and restless legs at night

Coconut water is an excellent source of electrolyte minerals – potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and sodium. Balanced levels of these minerals are necessary to maintain normal muscle action. And so deficiencies can cause cramping and restless legs at night
Cherries have been found to contain small amounts of melatonin, the hormone that regulates our sleep cycles

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Cherries have been found to contain small amounts of melatonin, the hormone that regulates our sleep cycles
Research shows cherries greatly improve sleep efficiency

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The truth about a glass of wine a day

Glass of wine

It may be the news most of us don’t want to hear. Despite countless stories about our favourite tipple having health benefits, and moderate drinking helping us live longer, a new study has sadly put those previous findings in doubt.

A team of scientists from the University of Victoria, Canada, have gone through 87 previous studies with a fine-toothed comb, and found the evidence in favour of moderate drinking to be riddled with flawed conclusions.

The Canadian research team found some of the previous studies drew from groups of alcohol abstainers who were in poor health due to former heavy drinking, or who did not drink due to exiting health issues. This created an abstainer bias that made all moderate drinkers look healthy in comparison.

Previous studies were found to be based on shaky, insignificant evidence and, according to Dr Tim Stockwell, director of UV’s Centre for Addictions Research, linked moderate drinking to “an implausibly wide range’ of health benefits.”

In some of the previous research, moderate drinkers were shown to have lower risks of deafness and liver cirrhosis, as well as better overall health, than people that abstained from drinking.

Previous studies have defined moderate drinking as a couple of standard alcoholic drinks per day, which has now been labelled as a “biologically insignificant” amount. Meaning the moderate drinkers were not ingesting enough alcohol to have any impact on their health.

After the Canadian reasearchers corrected their studies to account for the abstainer biases, moderate drinkers were shown to have no advantage over those who shunned alcohol.

Only 13 of the 87 analysed studies avoided biasing the non-drinking group, and only 6 of the previous studies were considered high quality, the UV researchers discovered.

While the latest research did not look at the claim that certain types of alcohol had more health benefits than others, Dr Stockwell believes that line of thinking is false too.

“If that were the case, it would be unlikely that the alcohol content itself deserved the credit.”

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8 Exotic Superfoods to Boost Your Immune System

Acia berries

Extracts from acai berries may destroy cancer cells, particularly those associated with leukemia.
Acai berries (pronounced ah-sigh-ee) are grown on the palm trees in the Amazon rainforest of northern Brazil. The name of the game with acai berries is pure antioxidant and nutrient power.

They fight leukemia. A well-known study, done by the University of Florida, found that extracts of the acai berry destroyed human cancer cells grown in a lab. More studies are needed to confirm its effects, but this step is definitely in the right direction.

They reduce inflammation. One of the best things that acai berries can do for you, due to the large amounts of anthocyanins they contain, is reduce inflammation associated with chronic diseases. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, fatigue syndromes, digestive discomforts, aches, and pains are all helped by reducing inflammation.

They shield your heart against disease. The pulp of acai berries has deep healing agents that contain antioxidants and fiber that reduces cholesterol — and keeps your digestive system healthy to boot!

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The 8 week diet that can reverse diabetes

 

GettyImages-164814714_620x310A crash diet lasting just eight weeks can reverse type 2 diabetes, experts have found.

Even people who had suffered with diabetes for a decade saw their condition eradicated after they restricted their eating for two months.

And six months after stopping the diet, participants in the Newcastle University trial were still free of the disease, suggesting that the condition had effectively been reversed.

The findings described last night as a “paradigm shift” in the understanding of diabetes could lead to a cheap way of dealing with the problem that affects 3.6million people in Britain. More than 257, 000 New Zealanders live with the disease.

Type 2 diabetes occurs either when the body does not produce enough insulin to control the blood sugar ñ or the cells donít react to it. The condition is often linked to obesity and usually occurs in middle age, coming with a risk of limb amputations, heart attacks and vision loss.

Experts used to think that once the disease had taken hold, it was incurable. But a growing body of evidence suggests that losing weight could reverse the condition. Scientists think that this is because removing fat from the pancreas allows insulin production to return to normal, eradicating the problem at the root of the disease.

Now, a British trial has suggested that the condition could not only be reversible but that the reverse could come in a matter of weeks.

Study leader Professor Roy Taylor said: “The bottom line is that if a person really wants to get rid of their type 2 diabetes, they can lose weight, keep it off and return to normal.”

In his trial, diabetics who ate just 700 calories a day made up of three diet shakes a day and some vegetables ñ lost an average of two stone (14kg) in eight weeks. Of the 30 participants, 12 saw their diabetes reversed.

The participants then gradually increased their eating to healthy levels, a third less on average than they ate before the trial. When they were reassessed six months later, none of the participants had put back the weight, and none of those whose diabetes had been reversed had seen the diabetes return.

Though the volunteers remained overweight, they had lost enough weight to remove the fat from the pancreas and allow normal insulin production to resume.

The authors, writing in the Diabetes Care medical journal, said: “Type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. The personal cost is enormous in terms of visual loss, amputation, and premature cardiovascular disease.

“The inevitably progressive nature of the disease has appeared beyond question. At diagnosis, patients are advised to accept having a lifelong disease.”

But they said their results showed that this approach had been incorrect. “Type 2 diabetes can now be understood to be a metabolic syndrome potentially reversible by substantial weight loss, and this is an important paradigm shift.”

Professor Taylor said: “What we have shown is that it is possible to reverse your diabetes, even if you have had the condition for a long time, up to around ten years. If you have had the diagnosis for longer than that, don’t give up hope ñ major improvement in blood sugar control is possible.

“The study also answered the question people often ask me ‘if I lose the weight and keep the weight off, will I stay free of diabetes?’ The simple answer is yes!

“Interestingly, even though all our volunteers remained obese or overweight, the fat did not drift back to clog up the pancreas.”

His team thinks that each person has a “personal fat threshold” and if they surpass this their body can no longer properly regulate blood sugar levels. The professor said: “If a person gains more weight than they personally can tolerate, then diabetes is triggered, but if they then lose that amount of weight then they go back to normal.

“Individuals vary in how much weight they can carry without it seeming to affect their metabolism – 70 per cent of severely obese people do not have diabetes.”

The team has already started a larger trial involving 280 patients to see if the results can be replicated. That trial, which reports back in 2018, will examine whether dieting can reverse type 2 diabetes in all patients, or if only certain people respond.

The number of people with diabetes has soared by two-thirds in the last decade, fuelled by Britain’s obesity epidemic. Last year the number topped 4million for the first time. Nine out of ten have type 2. The rest have the genetic form, type 1, an irreversible auto-immune disease which is nothing to do with lifestyle.

“I lost 2st and now eat normally. It’s changed my life”

In just two months Allan Tutty’s life changed. A crash diet lasting eight weeks slashed two and a half stone from his frame and reversed his type 2 diabetes.

The father of four had never felt fat, but scans showed a layer of blubber around his internal organs. Mr Tutty, 57, from Sunderland in the UK, said: “I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes around May 2011 during routine checks by my GP. While I didn’t feel fat, I was fat – on the inside. I’ve seen a scan of my liver and you can see the fat around it.”

Mr Tutty, who manages a brain injury unit at a care home and weighed more than 95 kilograms before the diet, added: “I took part in the Newcastle University research, spending eight weeks on a very low calorie diet which was really tough over Christmas and New Year but I was determined to complete it.

“In the two months, I lost two and a half stone and my pancreas was working within normal limits. With my diabetes in remission, I haven’t looked back. I eat normal foods, though I eat less than I used to, and I enjoy takeaways and chocolate but not on a regular basis so I have maintained my lower weight. My life has changed completely thanks to this research.”

– Daily Mail

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