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Could the sun help us live to a ripe old age? Women who soak up the rays twice as likely to be alive 20 years later than those who actively avoid them Read more:

Even with higher skin cancer risk, those who lap up sun should live longer
Avoiding sun may ‘do more harm than good’ and be worse than smoking
Researchers from Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, tracked 30,000 women
By FIONA MACRAE FOR THE DAILY MAIL

Lady sun bathing
A little sunshine won’t just brighten up your day – it could also help you live longer.
Research shows that even with the increased risk of skin cancer, those who lap up the sun are less likely to die young than those who prefer to stay in the shade.
In fact, women who soak up the rays are twice as likely to still be alive 20 years later as those who actively avoid them.
Woman who soak up the rays are more likely to be alive 20 years later than those who actively avoid them, according to scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm (posed by model)
Woman who soak up the rays are more likely to be alive 20 years later than those who actively avoid them, according to scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm (posed by model)
Swedish scientists concluded that staying out of the sun ‘may do more harm than good’ – and could pose as much a health risk as smoking.
However campaigners warn that sun-worshippers must not use the findings as an excuse to avoid protecting their skin.
Researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm examined data from almost 30,000 women whose health was tracked for two decades.

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The women were asked if they smoked and about their attitude to the sun – including whether they actively sunbathed or booked sunshine breaks abroad.
The results showed that those who sought out the rays were less likely to die of heart disease and other illnesses, apart from cancer.
But the researchers said it is precisely this lower chance of sickness that allows the women to live long enough to develop skin cancer.
Experts have warned that sitting in the sun – despite having benefits – can still increase a person’s risk of getting skin cancer
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Experts have warned that sitting in the sun – despite having benefits – can still increase a person’s risk of getting skin cancer
Another calculation suggested that staying out of the sun raises the odds of early death as much as smoking.
Writing in the Journal of Internal Medicine, the Swedes said they can’t be sure how sunlight is benefiting health.
However, one possibility is that it lowers blood pressure.
Another popular theory is that by raising levels of vitamin D, the rays help protect against a host of conditions such as diabetes and brittle bones. It could also stop stress taking a toll by boosting levels of feel-good endorphins in the body.
The results come just weeks after guidance from drugs rationing body NICE warned that there is no such thing as a healthy tan.
Last month, it urged Britons to slap on up to eight teaspoons of suncream during the summer or when visiting hot climates.
Cancer Research UK added that evidence showing sunbathing raises the risk of cancer is greater than that suggesting it wards off heart disease.
Sarah Williams, from the charity, said: ‘The only clear health benefit to spending time in the sun is producing vitamin D – there isn’t good evidence that it reduces the risk of heart disease. [But] the evidence is clear that the rays can increase the risk of skin cancer.’
Research from experts at Edinburgh University has previously suggested that sunshine lowers blood pressure, cutting the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

 

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Cancers due mainly to unhealthy lifestlye

Cancer ISN’T all in your genes: Up to 90% of cases ‘could be wiped out by avoiding triggers caused by our unhealthy lifestyles’

  • Study found factors like sunlight and diet play a bigger role than DNA
  • Healthy habits dramatically reduce the chances of getting cancer
  • Scientists are divided over how much cancer is caused by genes/ lifestyle 

Most cases of cancer are down to unhealthy lives, rather than bad genes, doctors said last night.

They said that factors in the world around us, from diet, to sunlight, cigarettes and disease, play a far bigger role in fuelling cancer than dodgy DNA.

Up 90 per cent of cancer cases would be wiped up if all these triggers could be avoided.

Dr Emma Smith, of Cancer Research UK, said: ‘Healthy habits like not smoking, keeping a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet and cutting back on alcohol are not a guarantee against cancer, they do dramatically reduce the risk of developing the disease.’

The new study claims that up to nine in ten cancers could be avoided if triggers linked to lifestyle were avoided

The new study claims that up to nine in ten cancers could be avoided if triggers linked to lifestyle were avoided

While the advice may not seem surprising, scientists are divided about how much cancer is caused by what we do and how much is unavoidable.

The controversy was stoked a year ago by research that claimed that most cases are caused by errors in DNA that are generated at random as the body ages and its cells divide.

The researchers said this meant that most cases of cancer were down to ‘bad luck’, rather than an unhealthy lifestyle.

It said that for or two out of three cancer victims, the cumulative effect of random mistakes in genes is to blame for the disease rather than poor choices about how they lived their lives or ‘chose’ their parents.

The latest study involved four analyses of the causes of cancer and used some of the same data as the first piece of research.

However, it came to the opposite conclusion, suggesting that cancer incidence is far too high to be explained by simple mutations in cell division alone.

They said that, if random mutations were to blame, there would be far fewer cases of cancer than there are.

Dr Yusuf Hannun, of Stony Brook University in the US, said that while luck plays a role, factors in the world around us are much more important.

These include diet, alcohol, cigarettes, sunburn, some viruses, pollution and likely other factors that have yet to be identified.

New study finds most cancers are caused by the way we live

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Getting rid of external risk factors, like smoking and some viruses, would reduce the incidence of all forms of the disease, including breast cancer, depicted

Getting rid of external risk factors, like smoking and some viruses, would reduce the incidence of all forms of the disease, including breast cancer, depicted

Previous studies have shown that people moving from low cancer incidence to countries with high cancer rates develop the same tumour incidences, which also suggests the risks are caused more by environment than genes.

Scientists also looked at patterns in the mutations associated with certain cancers and found that mutations during cell division rarely build up to the point of producing cancer, even in tissues with relatively high rates of cell division.

The team found that some exposure to environmental factors would be needed to set off the disease.

The Johns Hopkins University study earlier this year also failed to include common cancers such as prostate, breast, stomach, and cervix, which have been heavily linked to environmental causes.

In 2012, there were almost 339,000 of new cancer cases of cancer recorded and almost 162,000 deaths, according to figures from Cancer Research UK.

The chances of beating cancer in England is improving but still lags behind countries elsewhere in Europe, official figures revealed last month.

Previously experts have estimated that 30-40 per cent of cancer cases would be avoided given a better lifestyle, but there has been no similar calculation about whether the remainder can be prevented.

The new study claims that adopting a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce your chances of cancer

The new study claims that adopting a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce your chances of cancer

Writing in the journal Nature, he said that the genes we inherit from our parents only account for a very small number of cancer cases.

He concluded: ‘These results are important for strategizing cancer prevention, research and public health.’

Other experts said he had built a ‘compelling case’ for his argument.

Professor Kevin McConway, of the Open University, said: ‘The authors’ aim is to calculate what percentage of cancers would not arise, if we could wave a magic wand and get rid of all possible external risk factors.

‘There would still be cancers, because of the way that cells divide in the body. But there would be fewer of them.’

Dr Jian-Min Yuan, of the University of Pittsburgh in the US, said: ‘These results demonstrate that a large proportion of cancer is caused by environmental factors and are preventable if their underlying causes are identified.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3362965/How-cancer-ISN-T-genes-90-cancer-wiped-avoiding-triggers-caused-unhealthy-lifestyles.html#ixzz3uaqQp4w9
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