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The problem with managing your weight

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The problem with weight management today is massive because, there are so many schemes available, on the world wide net, in magazines, on tv, claiming to have the solution to our overweight problem.
It is becoming increasingly difficult to determine which is the right one.
Many of the diseases we are confronted with today could be associated with weight gain. We are more cautious of our weight today than ever before. Other factors are that we like to look trendy, so have to be in good shape. Thus the peer pressure. We are bombarded with adverts upon adverts about junk food, through billboards, tv adverts, magazines introducing sugary stuff, so the temptation is great.

2. The slimming world is so commercially successful because of the challenges we face. Due to health reasons, we are made more aware of the consequences of weight gain. There is peer pressure to keep abreast with fashion. That said, there is a strong attraction to junk foods and sugary desserts and so on, which come cheap. On top of all this the pressures of the modern world, and our attempt to succeed makes us want shortcuts to everything. So instead of for example cooking from scratch, we opt for the quickest solution, which is junk food. These without a doubt are fattening
The slimming industry is aware of the problems that confront us is coming out on tv, magazines, billboards, newspapers with adverts on how to win.

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Eating steak increases your chances of dying from NINE major diseases

Eating roast beef and lamb increases your chances of dying from nine major diseases, according to new research.

Red meat raises the risk of death from cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and diabetes, scientists have found.

Beef, lamb and pork also increase your susceptibility to stroke, infections and kidney, liver and lung disease.

Yet, regularly eating white meat may reverse the damage, the researchers added.

Those who frequently consume chicken and fish are 25 percent less likely to die from various diseases than those who rarely eat white meat

Roast beef & red meat

By courtesy of The Daily Mail

Consuming a Western diet increases the risk of developing gout, a new study from Harvard Medical School reveals.

A gout is a form of arthritis that affects around half a million adults in the UK.

Researchers have discovered that people are more likely to have the painful condition if they indulge in red and processed meats, soft drinks and sugary treats.

Yet, a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts and whole grains may protect against gout, they found.

The scientists believe healthy food helps to lower levels of a chemical called uric acid, which causes gout.

They hope the findings will lead to new gout treatments based on a diet of fruit, nuts and whole grains.

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute in Maryland tracked the eating habits of 536,000 men and women between the ages of 50 to 71 for 16 years.

They recorded how much meat the participants consumed, including processed and unprocessed red and white meat, as well as their fish intake.

Results, published in the British Medical Journal, revealed that people who ate the reddest meat were 26 percent more likely to die of various diseases than those who consume the least.

The scientists added that heme iron, a type only present in animal meat, may contribute to the risk of dying from cancer or heart disease.

The researchers said: ‘The results show increased risks of all-cause mortality and death due to nine different causes associated with both processed and unprocessed red meat.

‘They also show reduced risks associated with substituting white meat, particularly unprocessed white meat.

‘The effects of meat on human health may be due to ingredients such as heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites

They said: ‘High intakes of heme iron have been shown to be associated with cancer and cardiovascular disease.

‘Nitrates and nitrites are added to meat during the curing process.

‘Some investigators believe that nitrates from vegetable sources may have potential benefits, particularly for cardiovascular health, but nitrate/nitrite from drinking water and processed meat has been associated with increased risks of different cancers.’

The balancing diet myth is that no food can be considered ‘bad’ or ‘good’ because virtually any food can be consumed, provided it is a well-balanced diet. This means the so called ‘junk food’ ( fries, burgers, confectionery) can be freely consumed as long as they are ‘balanced’ by the consumption of other foods. This is quite noticeable these days when you visit fast food joints, the burgers are mixed with vegetables to make it healthy.

Most people should get all the nutrients they need by having a balanced diet although some few people may need to take extra supplements. Vitamins will make up for the short fall in nutrition, making it balanced

Vitamins and minerals are nutrients your body needs in small amounts to work properly and stay healthy.

 

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OBESITY CRISIS A ’30-YEAR PROBLEM’

Rob Hobson, head of nutrition at Healthspan
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The obesity epidemic is so huge it will take more than 30 years to fix, the Government has admitted.

Public health officials predict that it will be a decade before national sugar consumption is cut by just a fifth.
The stark admission by the Department of Health earlier this week comes just months after it released the long-awaited childhood obesity strategy.
Richard Sangster, head of obesity policy, said there was no quick fix to a ‘highly complex issue’.
‘It’s a problem that has taken 30 years or so to get to this point,’ he said. ‘It’s going to take a similar amount of time to tackle this issue.’
Poor diet and lifestyle have been blamed for fat becoming ‘the new normal’, with 61 per cent of adults officially classed as overweight or obese.
The strategy was a response to figures which revealed a third of children are overweight or obese by the time they leave primary school.
Speaking at a meeting chaired by Tory MP Maggie Throup, a member of the health select committee, Mr Sangster insisted Britain was leading the way in tackling obesity.
‘We think the obesity plan will give us around a fifth reduction in ten years,’ he said. ‘If we achieve that, that would be fantastic – no country in the world has reduced levels of obesity.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4074086/Are-happy-size-shape-body-Two-thirds-women-aren-t-half-want-lose-one-stone.html#ixzz4UMotf0cq
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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WHY WE GAIN WEIGHT

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We gain weight when we regularly consume more calories that we burn. Through bodily function and physical activities, we lose weight, and the more active we are the more we lose.
Research proves that more people are over weight than under weight.
In the UK nearly 60% of adults are over weight or obese.
So what causes weight gain

1. consuming too much food, we tend to have much bigger plates these days.
2. Eating unhealthy high fat foods or foods high in sugar
The thing is, the body tends to store the excess carbohydrates or sugar into fat. Some foods have so much more calories than others, so the need to make the right choices when it comes to food.
Alcohol for instance is high in calories, and should be consumed in moderation.
Medical Reasons

Balanced diet

Weight gain could be attributed to medical reasons,
1. An under active thyroid gland, this means the thyroid is not able to produce enough, thyroid hormones, to regulate metabolism, this is most common in older women.

Generally, as we age we lose muscle, due to inactivity, meaning we burn less, to reduce muscle loss we need to stay active.
So the watch word is to stay active. More to come….

Contains high fibre levels
Includes essential nutrients to support healthy, lasting weight loss
Formulated with chromium to help maintain normal blood sugar levels
Contributes to the maintenance of lean muscle and promotes weight loss

 

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Now experts say low fat diets are BAD for you.

Balanced diet

low fat diet
Cutting back on butter, cream, cheese and other fatty foods is fuelling the obesity epidemic with disastrous consequences for health, experts have warned.
In a damning report that accuses major public health bodies of colluding with the food industry, the National Obesity Forum and the Public Health Collaboration said most of what we are told about healthy eating is wrong.
The report’s authors say the epidemic’s roots lie in the modern-day obsession with low-fat diets, while snacking between meals is making people fat.
And their highly controversial report – which has been slammed by many other experts – cites studies which show a higher-fat, lower-carb diet to be superior.
It states: ‘Eating a diet rich in full-fat dairy – such as cheese, milk and yoghurt – can actually lower the chance of obesity.
‘The most natural and nutritious foods available – meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, olives, avocados – all contain saturated fat.’
Low fat diets are fuelling the obesity epidemic, an obesity charity claims. People should stop counting calories and eat healthy fats like butter, cream, cheese, eggs, salmon, avocado and nuts, it said

Low fat diets are fuelling the obesity epidemic, an obesity charity claims. People should stop counting calories and eat healthy fats like butter, cream, cheese, eggs, salmon, avocado and nuts, it said
WHY SUGAR – NOT FAT – IS FUELLING OBESITY, CARDIOLOGIST CLAIMS
Currently, the Government says people in the UK eat too much saturated fat.
It says the average man should eat no more than 30g of saturated fat a day, while the average woman should eat no more than 20g a day.
A diet high in saturated fat can increase levels of ‘bad cholesterol’ in the blood, raising the risk of heart disease.
But recently, that risk has been disputed.
Writing in the British Medical Journal, cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra said saturated fat has been ‘demonised for decades’ and there is no evidence it is linked with heart disease.
In fact, we should be eating more saturated fat to protect our hearts, he said.
He says it is sugar, not fat, which was causing so many of society’s health problems.
Sugar causes a rise in blood sugar levels, which triggers a spike in insulin – the hormone which clears glucose from the blood.
But insulin is a storage hormone, encouraging extra calories to be laid down in the body as fat.
Therefore sugar and carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, rice and potatoes are fueling the obesity epidemic, he said.
Calling for a ‘major overhaul’ of dietary guidelines, today’s report claims:
* Processed foods labelled ‘low fat’, ‘lite’, ‘low cholesterol’ or ‘proven to lower cholesterol’ should be avoided at all costs
* People with type 2 diabetes should eat a fat-rich diet rather than one based on carbohydrates.
* Sugar should be avoided and we should stop counting calories.
* The idea that exercise can help you ‘outrun a bad diet’ is a myth.
* Instead, a diet low in refined carbohydrates but high in healthy fats is ‘an effective and safe approach for preventing weight gain and aiding weight loss’, and cuts the risk of heart disease.
* The report’s authors call for a return to ‘whole foods’ such as meat, fish and dairy, as well as high fat healthy foods including avocados, arguing that ‘eating fat does not make you fat’.
* Eating a diet rich in full fat dairy – such as cheese, milk and yoghurt – can actually lower the chance of obesity.
* Saturated fat does not cause heart disease, while full fat diary can actually protect the heart.
It states: ‘The most natural and nutritious foods available – meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, olive, avocados – all contain saturated fat.
‘The continued demonisation of omnipresent natural fat drives people away from highly nourishing, wholesome and health promoting foods.’
nuts

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Professor David Haslam, chairman of the National Obesity Forum, said: ‘As a clinician, treating patients all day every day, I quickly realised guidelines from on high, suggesting high carbohydrate, low fat diets were the universal panacea, were deeply flawed.
‘Current efforts have failed – the proof being that obesity levels are higher than they have ever been, and show no chance of reducing despite the best efforts of Government and scientists.’
Co-author of the report, Aseem Malhotra, is a founding member of the Public Health Collaboration – a charity made up of dietitians, scientists and doctors.
As a clinician, treating patients all day every day, I quickly realised guidelines from on high, suggesting high carbohydrate, low fat diets were the universal panacea, were deeply flawed
Professor David Haslam, chairman of the National Obesity Forum
He said promoting low-fat foods was ‘perhaps the biggest mistake in modern medical history resulting in devastating consequences for public health’.
‘Sadly this unhelpful advice continues to be perpetuated.
‘The current Eatwell guide from Public Health England is in my view more like a metabolic timebomb than a dietary pattern conducive for good health.
‘We must urgently change the message to the public to reverse obesity and type 2 diabetes.
‘Eat fat to get slim, don’t fear fat, fat is your friend. It’s now truly time to bring back the fat.’
Professor Iain Broom, from Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, said in agreement: ‘The continuation of a food policy recommending high carbohydrate, low fat, low calorie intakes as ‘healthy eating’ is fatally flawed.
‘Our populations for almost 40 years, have been subjected to an uncontrolled global experiment that has gone drastically wrong.’
However the report has caused a huge backlash among the scientific community.
Co-author of the report, consultant cardiologist Aseem Malhotra said: ‘Eat fat to get slim, don’t fear it, fat is your friend. It’s now truly time to bring back the fat’
Co-author of the report, consultant cardiologist Aseem Malhotra said: ‘Eat fat to get slim, don’t fear it, fat is your friend. It’s now truly time to bring back the fat’
The controversial claims have been heavily criticised by other experts who accused the report’s authors of cherry picking evidence to suit their own arguments.
Professor Tom Sanders, of King’s College London, said: ‘The claim that eating fat doesn’t make you fat is absurd. If you eat a lot of fat, you will get fat.’
THE NEW ADVICE IN BRIEF
In a nutshell, the new advice states:
Eating a diet rich in full-fat dairy – such as cheese, milk and yoghurt – can actually lower the chance of obesity.
The most natural and nutritious foods available – meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, olives, avocados – all contain saturated fat.
And Professor John Wass, the Royal College of Physicians’ special adviser on obesity, said there was ‘good evidence that saturated fat increases cholesterol’.
He added: ‘What is needed is a balanced diet, regular physical activity and a normal healthy weight. To quote selective studies risks misleading the public.’
Professor Simon Capewell, from the Faculty of Public Health, added: ‘We fully support Public Health England’s new guidance on a healthy diet. Their advice reflects evidence-based science that we can all trust. It was not influenced by industry.
‘By contrast, the report from the National Obesity Forum is not peer reviewed.
‘Furthermore, it does not it indicate who wrote it or how is was funded. That is worrying.’
The most natural and nutritious foods available – meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, olives, avocados – all contain saturated fat, the report says
The most natural and nutritious foods available – meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, olives, avocados – all contain saturated fat, the report says
Dr Mike Knapton, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation (BHF), said: ‘This report is full of ideas and opinion, however it does not offer the robust and comprehensive review of evidence that would be required for the BHF, as the UK’s largest heart research charity, to take it seriously.
‘This country’s obesity epidemic is not caused by poor dietary guidelines; it is that we are not meeting them.’
‘This report is full of ideas and opinion, however it does not offer the robust and comprehensive review of evidence that would be required for the UK’s largest heart research charity, to take it seriously
Dr Mike Knapton, associate medical director, British Heart Foundation
The row comes just two months after a landmark report in The Lancet revealed more than one in ten men and one in seven women around the globe are now obese.
And the situation is only set to get worse, with experts predicting almost a fifth of us will fall into this category within a decade.
The alarming statistics were part of the world’s biggest obesity study, which measured the height and weight of nearly 20 million adults.
It revealed there are currently 640 million obese people around the globe, comprising 266 million men and 375 million women.
Overall, the fattest men and women now live in China and the USA.
However the USA still has the highest number of severely obese men and women in the world.
In Britain, obesity rates are 28.4 per cent for women – the second highest in Europe behind only Malta – and 26.2 per cent for men, the worst in the continent.
And in a decade, it will be the fattest nation in Europe, with almost 40 per cent of adults obese.
Type 2 diabetes rates are soaring, fuelled by obesity, and the condition uses up a tenth of the NHS’s budget.
HEALTHY FATS AND WHY THEY ARE GOOD FOR US
A small amount of fat is an essential part of a healthy, balanced diet.
Fat is a source of essential fatty acids such as omega-3 – ‘essential’ because the body can’t make them itself.
Fat also helps the body absorb vitamins A, D and E.
There are different types of fat and some are better for us than others, the Government claims.
To cut the risk of heart disease, the Government recommends cutting the amount of saturated fat – found in meat and dairy products – with unsaturated fat.
Monounsaturated fats – such as those found in avocado, olive oil and nuts – help protect our hearts
Monounsaturated fats – such as those found in avocado, olive oil and nuts – help protect our hearts
There is good evidence that replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats can help lower cholesterol, it says.
Found primarily in oils from plants, unsaturated fats can be either polyunsaturated or monounsaturated.
Monounsaturated fats help protect our hearts by maintaining levels of HDL cholesterol while reducing levels of LDL cholesterol.
Monounsaturated fats are found in:
olive oil, rapeseed oil and their spreads
avocados

327756BC00000578-0-image-a-66_1458677885409some nuts, such as almonds, brazils and peanuts
There are two types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 and omega-6.
Some types of omega-3 and omega-6 fats cannot be made by the body and are therefore essential in small amounts in the diet.
Omega-6 fats are found in vegetable oils such as rapeseed, corn, sunflower and some nuts.
Omega-3 fats are found in oily fish such as mackerel, kippers, herring, trout, sardines, salmon and fresh tuna.
Polyunsaturated fats can help lower the level of LDL cholesterol.
Too much LDL cholesterol can lead to fatty deposits developing in the arteries, which can restrict the flow of blood to the heart and brain, increasing the risk of

some nuts, such as almonds, brazils and peanuts
There are two types of polyunsaturated fats: omega-3 and omega-6.
Some types of omega-3 and omega-6 fats cannot be made by the body and are therefore essential in small amounts in the diet.
Omega-6 fats are found in vegetable oils such as rapeseed, corn, sunflower and some nuts.
Omega-3 fats are found in oily fish such as mackerel, kippers, herring, trout, sardines, salmon and fresh tuna.
Polyunsaturated fats can help lower the level of LDL cholesterol.
Too much LDL cholesterol can lead to fatty deposits developing in the arteries, which can restrict the flow of blood to the heart and brain, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke.
Replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats may also help reduce triglyceride levels.
Triglycerides are fatty substances mostly made by the liver.
High levels of triglycerides in the blood have also been linked with narrowing of the arteries.
Source: NHS Choices

Balanced diet

Scandal of the new ‘healthy eating’ guidelines that the food and drinks industry helped to develop
Today’s report also argued the science of food has been ‘corrupted by commercial influences’, with food industry representatives having a major influence on Public Health England’s Eatwell Guide.
As MailOnline reported at the time, the graphic was developed with members of the food and drinks industry, documents show.
The image for the Eatwell Guide, which was unveiled in March, was decided upon by a reference group made up of almost 50 per cent industry members.
These included the British Retail Consortium, the Food and Drink Federation, and the Institute of Grocery Distribution, whose members include Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Waitrose, as well as major food producers and brands.
The new Eatwell Guide, produced by Public Health England, was developed with members of the food and drinks industry, documents show
The new Eatwell Guide, produced by Public Health England, was developed with members of the food and drinks industry, documents show
The group also included representatives from the Association of Convenience Stores and the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB), which is funded by farmers and growers and supports the meat, dairy and potato industry.
Other members of the review group included health bodies such as Association for Nutrition and the British Nutrition Foundation.
HOW THE REVISED ‘HEALTHY EATING’ PLATE LOOKS NOW
The revised guide, issued in March, put high-fat and high-sugar foods outside the healthy eating ‘wheel’, with a warning to ‘eat less often and in small amounts’.
The dairy section was cut to almost half its previous size and replaced with pictures of several lower fat options.
The beans, pulses, fish, meat and eggs section remained the same size but advised people to ‘eat less red and processed meat’.
The guide also told consumers to eat ‘at least’ five portions of fruit and veg per day, while the section for potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates was beefed up to give a slightly bigger role for these foods.
A new oils and spreads section also urged people to ‘choose unsaturated oils and use in small amounts’, while people were also told to drink water, lower-fat milk or sugar-free drinks.
Criticism of PHE’s links with industry have been made in a new report from the National Obesity Forum and the Public Health Collaboration.
It is not the first time PHE’s association with industry has come under scrutiny.
Last year, experts in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and The Lancet criticised the evidence used by PHE in its report on e-cigarettes.
Researchers questioned the robustness of the data and pointed to links between some experts, the tobacco industry and firms that manufacture e-cigarettes.
An editorial in The Lancet medical journal attacked the ‘extraordinarily flimsy foundation’ on which PHE based its major conclusion.
And in the BMJ, two further researchers said PHE’s claims that ‘the current best estimate is that e-cigarettes are around 95 per cent less harmful than smoking’ came from a single meeting of 12 people, some of whom had links to industry.
The external reference group for the Eatwell Guide met several times between 2014 and 2015.
Their terms of reference included revising the segment sizes for the Eatwell Plate, reviewing the visuals and ‘approaches for reflecting messages on foods that should be consumed in limited amounts’, the documents, seen by the Press Association following enquiries to PHE, show.
The eventual guide put high-fat and high-sugar foods outside the healthy eating ‘wheel’, with a warning to ‘eat less often and in small amounts’.
The dairy section was cut to almost half its previous size and replaced with pictures of several lower fat options.
The revised guide also told consumers to eat ‘at least’ five portions of fruit and veg per day, while the section for potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates was beefed up to give a slightly

Whole meal bread

The revised guide also told consumers to eat ‘at least’ five portions of fruit and veg per day, while the section for potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates was beefed up to give a slightly
The beans, pulses, fish, meat and eggs section remained the same size but advised people to ‘eat less red and processed meat’.
The guide also told consumers to eat ‘at least’ five portions of fruit and veg per day, while the section for potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates was beefed up to give a slightly bigger role for these foods.
The refresh of the Eatwell model was conducted openly using robust scientific approaches
Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England
A new oils and spreads section also urged people to ‘choose unsaturated oils and use in small amounts’, while people were also told to drink water, lower-fat milk or sugar-free drinks.
Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at PHE, said decisions on the graphic were made separately to the nutritional recommendations underpinning them.
She said: ‘Our independent experts review all the available evidence – often hundreds of scientific papers – run full-scale consultations and go to great lengths to ensure no bias when developing our scientific advice on nutrition.
‘These recommendations are completely separate to the Eatwell model, which is a visual way of presenting the information.
‘The refresh of the Eatwell model was conducted openly using robust scientific approaches.
‘Advice was generated from an external reference group engaging interested stakeholders; including health, voluntary and industry representatives to ensure a wide range of views were considered.’

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Waitrose home for healthy foods

Cucamelons are not modified, have grown naturally in Mexico for centuries
Can be eaten straight from plant, tossed with olives or popped in a martini
The plants will be available to purchase from Wednesday for £4
By SEAN POULTER FOR THE DAILY MAIL

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It looks like a watermelon but is the size of a grape and tastes something like a cross between a cucumber and a lime.
The tiny cucamelon is not some genetically modified laboratory creation, but rather an import which originated in the wilds of Mexico thousands of years ago.
And now, it has reached the high street as a grow-your-own plant alongside tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce.
Cucamelon plants and Indigo Rose tomato plants go on sale in 50 Waitrose branches costing £4 a pot

Cucamelon plants and Indigo Rose tomato plants go on sale in 50 Waitrose branches costing £4 a pot
Waitrose is to offer pots of the vines that produce the cucamelons as part of a wider collection of plants that can be grown on a windowsill, tub or a vegetable plot.
The cucamelon plants have been grown by Suttons Seeds in Yorkshire and are part of a range created by James Wong, the Kew-trained botanist, science writer and author of the book Homegrown Revolution.
It also includes several salad tomato varieties, sweetcorn, cucumber and peppers, including the powerful Scotch Bonnet chilli.
.

1941DCEF000005DC-0-image-a-2_1459899047036
Mr Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack with drinks – or even popped in a martini.’
The versatile plants can be grown easily and in the same way as a regular cucumber.
And there is no need for the cover of a greenhouse as long as there isn’t a risk of frost.
The cucamelon, which has the Latin name Melothria scabra, is a vine grown for its edible fruit which originated in Mexico and Central America.
Other common names include sandiita or little watermelon, mouse melon, Mexican sour gherkin, Mexican miniature watermelon and Mexican sour cucumber.
They are pest and drought resistant and, in theory, the slow-growing vines can eventually grow up to ten feet under proper conditions.
Range-creator James Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack – or even popped in a martini.’

Range-creator James Wong said: ‘The cucamelons can be eaten straight off the plant, or tossed with olives, slivers of pepper and a dousing of olive oil for a quirky snack – or even popped in a martini.’
Victoria Mason, Waitrose outdoor plant buyer, said: ‘We know that, after cooking, gardening is our customers’ favourite hobby, so we wanted to introduce something a little bit out of the ordinary that they can grow and enjoy.
‘This fun fruit is easy to grow so is the perfect plant for all ages to try their hand at gardening.
‘The new James Wong range shows you don’t have to stick with the traditional when growing your own vegetables and offers some exciting new additions for our customers’ gardens.’
The plants will be available from wednesday and will be in the majority of Waitrose branches by the end of April.
They are priced at £4 and are on a 3 for £10 mix and match offer along with other grow-your-old plants in the range.

Centrum Advance Multivitamin and Multiminerals 100 Tablet

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  • Centrum Advance is a comprehensive daily multivitamin and multimineral supplement
  • With balanced nutrient combinations
  • Supplements your diet and lifestyle by containing essential vitamins and minerals recommended on a daily basis
  • Vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6 and minerals phosphorus and magnesium help release energy from food to contribute to your overall health and well-being
  • Contains vitamins A and Biotin to help healthy skin and vitamin C, which contributes to the normal function of the immune system

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8 Exotic Superfoods to Boost Your Immune System

Acia berries

Extracts from acai berries may destroy cancer cells, particularly those associated with leukemia.
Acai berries (pronounced ah-sigh-ee) are grown on the palm trees in the Amazon rainforest of northern Brazil. The name of the game with acai berries is pure antioxidant and nutrient power.

They fight leukemia. A well-known study, done by the University of Florida, found that extracts of the acai berry destroyed human cancer cells grown in a lab. More studies are needed to confirm its effects, but this step is definitely in the right direction.

They reduce inflammation. One of the best things that acai berries can do for you, due to the large amounts of anthocyanins they contain, is reduce inflammation associated with chronic diseases. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, fatigue syndromes, digestive discomforts, aches, and pains are all helped by reducing inflammation.

They shield your heart against disease. The pulp of acai berries has deep healing agents that contain antioxidants and fiber that reduces cholesterol — and keeps your digestive system healthy to boot!

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Four mistakes you’re making each morning

Four mistakes you’re making each morning

By Michelle Pellizzon

GettyImages-181836329_620x310
Relying on an alarm means your body doesn’t wake up naturally. Photo / Getty
Relying on an alarm means your body doesn’t wake up naturally. Photo / Getty
One thing that some of the most successful people in business, art, and politics all have in common? They have a regular morning routine.

But here’s the thing: The decisions you make in the morning can either set you up for success and encourage you to make healthy choices for the rest of your waking hours or seriously sabotage your overall wellness. Read on to find out if you’re accidentally making things harder for yourself – and what you should be doing instead.

Problem: Hitting the snooze button
Realising that you can stay bundled under the covers for a few more minutes always feels like a gift – but whether you snooze one, two, or 10 times, you’re really messing with your body’s sleep cycle. Instead of helping you feel more rested and easing you into the day, those extra few minutes of sleep actually leave you feeling groggy and tired.

Why? For starters, relying on an alarm means that your body doesn’t wake up naturally, which throws off your circadian rhythm.

The circadian rhythm is basically your internal “clock”, which follows roughly a 24-hour cycle and tells your body when to sleep, wake up, and so on.

It triggers feelings of sleepiness at night and wakes you up in the morning once you’ve gotten enough rest. Getting jolted awake by a shrill iPhone alarm disrupts the body’s natural flow and throws you off for the rest of the day.

And according the National Sleep Foundation in the US, the sleep that you do get during that short window of snoozing isn’t high-quality stuff. Snoozing can result in sleep inertia, a feeling of grogginess and disorientation that occurs after you wake up from a short period of sleep and can last for hours.

Finally, getting enough sleep is imperative for regulation of ghrelin and leptin, the two hormones that control hunger and cravings. Ghrelin is the “hunger hormone” that sends signals to your brain to let you know you need food, and leptin is responsible for telling your body that you’re sated so it doesn’t need to feel hungry. When sleep-deprived, leptin drops by 15 per cent while ghrelin spikes 15 per cent, meaning that you’ll feel more hungry, but when you do eat, you don’t feel as full.

Solution: Set your alarm later

It’s possible to train yourself to wake up as the sun rises, but for most of us that’s not realistic. Your best bet is to set the alarm for a little later and skip the snooze. Seems like a no-brainer, but instead of setting your alarm for 6am and planning on snoozing for another hour, just wake up at 7am! It won’t be such a struggle to pull yourself out of bed because you’ll have had an extra hour of deep sleep.

Problem: Checking your phone from bed in the a.m.
A whopping 71 per cent of people copped to sleeping with or next to their smartphones – a habit that not only messes with how quickly you fall asleep, but can also have repercussions the next morning.

Spending a few minutes scrolling through your newsfeed, checking out the latest sales that hit your inbox, and responding to work emails well before you’ve made it to the office can actually cause a spike in anxiety and reduce your ability to focus throughout the day.

According to productivity expert Sid Savara, checking email first thing in the morning signifies that you don’t have a “clear list of priorities”, and you’re more likely to get caught up in busy work than actually accomplish all the things you’d like to. Instead of taking some time to think about tackling your to-do list, you hit the ground running – which leads to a more chaotic day.

Solution: Swap screen time for Zen time

Instead of using your first waking moments to scan Instagram, take 10 minutes to breathe and meditate. Scientific studies show that regular meditation can reduce anxiety levels, encourage “big picture” thinking and a positive outlook overall, and improve the ability to concentrate.

Problem: Skipping breakfast and relying on coffee
Replacing cereal or toast with coffee to cut calories and keep your energy up might seem like a smart idea, but it might actually sabotage your weight-loss goals.

And it’s not for the reason you think – contrary to popular belief, eating breakfast doesn’t kickstart your metabolism. Studies show zero difference in calories burned in one day in people who skip breakfast versus those that eat breakfast. On the flip side, drinking coffee does actually increase your metabolism.

But when you’re relying on caffeine alone – especially when you’re stressed – to power through your work or make it through the morning, it can increase the production of the hormone cortisol. Too much cortisol can result in extra belly fat, lowered immune function, and impaired cognition – exactly the opposite of the reason you’re skipping out on breakfast.

Solution: Find an on-the-go option that energises and satiates

Grabbing a cup of coffee to wake up is OK, but make sure you give your body a little fuel. A protein shake, nutrition bar, or even a piece of toast with almond butter are all relatively low in calories but have enough macronutrients to keep you both energised and relaxed under pressure.

Problem: Skimping on sleep for morning workouts
You drag yourself out of bed for your scheduled morning spin class despite the bags under your eyes – we have to admire your dedication. But do you ever wonder when your workout stops being worth your while?

If you’re sleep-deprived, it does your body more harm than good. Chronic sleep deprivation – or getting six hours or less a night on a regular basis – actually makes gym sessions less effective and can cause injury. Studies show that not only do tired athletes move more slowly, their balance and motor function is impaired. On a cellular level, the bodies of sleep-deprived people are more inflamed, can’t repair their muscles as well, and are more likely to succumb to overtraining syndrome – which can be catastrophic if you’re working long-term towards a big race or event.

Solution: Skip it

One night of bad sleep isn’t enough to wreck the effects of a great workout. But if you’ve only racked up five hours of sleep a night for a few weeks, you’ll do yourself more good by getting extra rest.

– news.com.au

By Michelle Pellizzon EmailPrint

Posted on

How stress can destroy your health

Family physician Dr Roger Henderson warns many don’t know stress dangers
He outlines the illnesses stress can cause, from IBS to hair loss
Dr Henderson also explains how to tackle each illness and the stress causing it

PUBLISHED: 23:05, 30 December 2016 | UPDATED: 23:37, 30 December 2016

Stress can take a real toll on your body.
Headaches may become more frequent, it may be difficult to get the right amount of sleep and even the digestive system can often act out of sorts.
Here family physician Dr Roger Henderson reveals some of the health conditions that can be exacerbated by stress and what you can do to manage them.
1. IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME
What happens?
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) affects around 13 million Britons and 45 million Americans.
Seventy percent of doctors say it is the most common digestive condition they see in practice.
The pain of IBS is caused by muscle spasms in the bowel and although symptoms can vary from person to person, they can include abdominal pain and discomfort, diarrhea and constipation as well as bloating of the abdomen.
Experts don’t know exactly why the condition develops, although they do agree that there are some things that can trigger symptoms with stress being one of the most common.
In fact, 94 percent of British doctors surveyed by Buscopan IBS Relief said the most common trigger for their patients’ IBS flare ups was stress.
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What the doctor says
Family doctor Dr Roger Henderson says: ‘It’s widely recognised that there’s a complex connection between the brain and the digestive system which is why our mood can often affect the way our tummies feel.
‘The stomach and intestines are lined with millions of nerve cells, which control and regulate the digestive system.
‘These nerve cells help to pass messages from the gut to the brain and vice versa so it’s no surprise that a lot of information our gut sends to the brain affects how we feel.
‘This is why you might feel butterflies when you’re nervous or crave fatty foods when you’re stressed.
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‘Stress can alter the connection between the gut and the brain and affect the movement and contractions of the GI tract so people with IBS can be very sensitive to stress.
‘While it’s almost impossible to avoid stress completely there are things you can do to help.
‘Try exercising or some simple breathing techniques to help you stay calm. It’s also helpful to talk to someone about what’s on your mind or go out with friends doing something you enjoy.
‘Stress can’t always be avoided so if you do experience an IBS flare up have some medication to hand just in case.
‘Antispasmodics can be taken at the first sign of a flare up and quickly work to ease spasms in the intestines at the root cause of pain.’
2. EXCESSIVE SWEATING
What happens?
Scientists have various theories as to why we sweat when we’re stressed, including it being a sign to those around us that someone is suffering from distress.
What is clear is that sweat from environmental heat or physical activity is produced by your eccrine sweat glands, while sweat caused by stress comes primarily from your apocrine glands.
What the doctor says
Family doctor Dr Roger Henderson says: ‘There are nearly four million sweat glands throughout the human body, and most can be found on your palms, soles of your feet, face and armpits.
‘There are two types of glands that secret sweat. The first type are those that excrete when you are active called eccrine glands which are mostly made up of water.
‘The second type are apocrine glands that are found in areas of concentrated hair follicles such as your armpits which are larger in size and excrete a thicker form of sweat containing more proteins and lipids.

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There is a certain kind of sweat that can only be caused by stress
‘It is this fattier sweat that scientists believe bacteria most like to feed on and the reason for strong body odor.
‘When our bodies are in stress mode, otherwise known as flight or fight, these glands push sweat to the surface of the skin.
‘Although excessive sweating can feel like a taboo subject, if your sweating is starting to interfere with your daily life it’s a good idea to visit your GP.’
3. TEETH GRINDING
What happens?
Research has found a link between stress and teeth grinding, which 70 percent of Britons have reported.
Known as bruxism, teeth grinding can go undetected as the most common symptom is a headache, usually concentrated at the temples of the head.
Other symptoms include sleep disorders, ear ache, and stiff muscles in the jaw, shoulders and neck.
The teeth will also show signs of wear, cracks and tooth loss can result.
This is caused by the unconscious clenching of the jaw and friction of both sets of teeth grinding against one another, most commonly during sleep.
What the doctor says
Family doctor Dr Roger Henderson says: ‘If you suspect that you are suffering from Bruxism, it is important to see your dentist who can provide a proper diagnosis.
‘Grinding your teeth can be triggered by several factors including an underlying sleep disorder, stress and anxiety or a result of dietary intakes such as alcohol and caffeine.
‘Your dentist will recommend a guard specially made for your teeth to create a protective barrier from friction to prevent increased tooth wear and reduce discomfort of the jaw muscles.’
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5. INSOMNIA
What happens?
Stress and sleepless nights have long gone hand in hand.
In most cases of insomnia, reducing stress has been shown to alleviate sleeplessness, make it easier to fall asleep and improve the quality of sleep.
The hormones caused by stress induce our bodies into what is known as hyperarousal, which disrupts the balance between sleep and wakefulness.
What the doctor says
Dr Henderson says: ‘When we are stressed we often find ourselves lying in bed staring into the darkness, while constantly thinking about all our worries.
‘There are a few things you can do to prep the body for sleep. Try avoiding all screens at least two hours before bed, as they have been shown to disrupt sleep.
‘It is also important to go to bed at the same time each night and to get up at the same time each morning.
‘Daily exercise has also been found to increase feelings of wellbeing and to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression and so aid sleep.
‘Make sure you eat a well-balanced diet every day and avoid drinks that contain caffeine and alcohol as they’ll only exacerbate the problem.’
6. FATIGUE
What happens?
Exhaustion is a chronic feeling of a lack of motivation or energy often as a result of insomnia induced by stress.
The Mental Health Foundation found that nearly a third of the British population are sleep-deprived, most often because of career and finance worries.
What the doctor says
Dr Henderson says: ‘The stresses and strains of daily life can be exhausting and can make you feel drained.
‘It has been shown that mental health problems such as anxiety can leave you feeling more tired, even after resting.
‘This is the key to knowing if you are suffering from stress related fatigue.
‘Not only does stress prevent you from getting a proper night’s sleep, it also often produces a low mood, both of which lead to fatigue.
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Posted on

How testosterone can make men kind and generous

By Harry Pettit For Mailonline
PUBLISHED: 09:49, 30 December 2016
Testosterone has long been associated with aggression and competition in men.
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But the versatile sex hormone can also impact a range of emotional states including empathy, generosity, of corruption, and risk taking.

Experts speculate that there may be more to the hormone than first thought, and that testosterone could be just as useful for cooperation as competition.

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Testosterone has long been associated with aggression and competition in men. But the versatile sex hormone can also impact a range of emotional states including generosity
Testosterone has long been associated with aggression and competition in men. But the versatile sex hormone can also impact a range of emotional states including generosity

WHY IS TESTOSTERONE IMPORTANT?

It seems that for every question scientists answer on testosterone, more are raised in its place.

‘Testosterone is important to study because it has such profound actions, it has shaped human history,’ Imperial College London behavioural expert Dr Ed Roberts told MailOnline.

‘It has numerous effects, because to be effective in enabling successful reproduction, T has to do many other things.

‘This includes providing a weapon, such as teeth, claws, muscles); increase aggression, competitiveness, risk-taking and the tendency for group formation (gangs, clubs etc),’ he said.

EMPATHY
A study published earlier this year suggests that testosterone controls our empathy to gear us up for competition.

Researchers showed that the sex hormone can scramble communication between parts of the brain which process emotions, ultimately lowering levels of empathy.

In the study, led by Dr Peter Bos of Utrecht University, a small group of women was tested to see what effect testosterone had on how their brains processed empathy.

Sixteen college students were enrolled, half of which were given oral testosterone at doses high enough to boost the levels of the hormone in their blood by 10 times.

They then had to try and identify the emotions of people, just by looking at pictures of their eyes.